Our Mission

Working for a Strong American Maritime Capability

Transportation Institute closely monitors the workings and decisions of the US Congress and the wide range of administrative agencies of the federal and state governments as they affect waterborne transportation. The Institute staff conducts research and study projects on all maritime-related issues and testifies at congressional and government agency hearings and inquiries which affect marine transportation. Liaison is maintained with all congressional offices and those of the executive branch of government when maritime issues are under consideration.

Transportation Institute issues a number of publications and other materials designed to inform the public, the Congress, and the government of important merchant marine matters. Transportation Institute plays a prominent role in national forums, seminars, and public policy meetings where questions of maritime policy are under debate.

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MERCHANT SHIPS IN SERVICE

122
TANKERS
436
DREDGES
2.9
BULK CARRIERS
4.8
TANK-BARGES
5.4
TOWBOATS
26
CARGO BARGES

Fast Facts

industry highlights

The largest part of merchandise trade — over 1.3 billion metric tons of cargo — is moved by water.

Another billion tons of cargo is carried in domestic waterborne movements, which serve over 90 percent of the U.S. population.

Analysts predict maritime trade volumes to triple worldwide by 2050.

jones act

Jones Act vessels must be controlled by U.S. citizens with at least 75% U.S. percent ownership.

Jones Act vessels must be built (or rebuilt) in the U.S. and at least 75% crewed by U.S. citizens.

All Jones Act vessels must be U.S.-flagged.

News & Events

National
Defense

America’s reliance upon its merchant marine, ports, shipyards, and maritime industries for both trade and defense has been constant since colonial days.

Economic
Development

Shipping requires a large quantity and variety of economic resources to compete and every maritime nation offers assistance to its maritime industries.